Phoebe Darqueling Shares Her Greatest Sci-Fi Gadget During OWS CyCon 2019

Greatest Gadgets bannerI’m hosting another fantastic stop in our Greatest Gadgets blog hop! On this stop, we’re highlighting awesome Sci-Fi tech, and you can find a full list of participating authors and topics for this hop on the OWS Cycon website. Let’s dive in!

Welcome Phoebe Darqueling!

Before we dive in to the nitty gritty, what is Riftmaker about?

Save his boy, uncover a conspiracy, and master opposable thumbs—a dog’s work is never done.

Buddy’s favorite thing is curling up for a nap at the foot of Ethan’s bed. Then he stumbles through a portal to a clockwork city plagued by chimeras, and everything changes… Well, not everything. Sure, his new human body comes with magic powers, but he’d still rather nap than face the people of Excelsior, who harbor both desire and fear when it comes to “the other side.”

He discovers Ethan followed him through the portal and underwent his own transformation, and it becomes Buddy’s doggone duty to save him. Buddy finds unlikely allies in an aristocrat with everything on the line, a mechanic with something to hide, and a musician willing to do anything to protect her. Using a ramshackle flying machine, the group follows the chimeras deep into the forest and uncovers a plot that could reshape the worlds on both sides of the rift.

What can you tell us about the piece of Sci Fi tech you’re featuring today?

My gadget is same as the title of the book: the riftmaker.

As Lucy explains it, “Everything in the universe has a melody, something that transcends the barriers between worlds and is unique to them. But each world is like a different instrument, and the melody sounds different depending on whether you are using a flute or piano to play it. In other words, our ‘melodies’ resonate differently depending on the parameters of the worlds they inhabit, and that resonance is reflected in one’s physical body.”

By finding the right resonance coefficient and tuning the riftmaker machine to the same frequency, rifts open and provide a passageway to “the other side.” But because of the difference in resonance, the matter of a person is rearranged into a corresponding animal and vice versa. The main character of Riftmaker is Buddy, a dog in search of his boy in a strange clockwork city plagued by monsters that feed on fear. There are traces of our world called Artefacts, which are more technologically advanced than what is native to Excelsior because movement between worlds became restricted around 1860 in our world. It’s a delicate piece of machinery, and only one man knows how to build one.

“The riftmaker was a complicated aggregate of Artefacts, brass, wires, and glass vials of chemicals. The professor had explained to Ethan that the Artefacts were actually just for show, “modifications” he had insisted the machine required to make passage in human form possible. In the Commander’s pursuit of his goal, he had his army collect everything the professor had asked for from the other side, and Fenwick had attached them all over the machine with colored wires to make them appear integral. The real work focused on the various canisters of liquid, and the wire pulled taut between them. He sat back, satisfied that he accomplished his goal. The vials were all just loose enough that the vibrations would cause the desired effect, and hopefully, their escape.”

Find out more

Where can people find you on the web?

During OWS CyCon, you can connect with me and ask questions in my author booths on the CyCon website (my books are separated into Sci Fi and Fantasy). I’m also a participant in the “Sci Fi Goes Punk” World-building Showcase.

Connect with me on Twitter and Facebook, and if are a fan of FREE BOOKS (and who isn’t?), sign up for my email list and get your copy of The Steampunk Handbook sent right to your inbox.

For more stops on our blog hops, visit the tour page on the OWS CyCon website. You can also find more great Sci Fi authors and books on our main Sci Fi event page.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s